Wonderful Photographs of Manila Then & Now

While browsing online searching for Philippine history topics, I came across different forums showcasing old pictures around the country mostly with wonderful photographs of Manila then and now. I was amazed by the majestic beauty and simplicity of our country. Looking at the old photos made me realize how resplendent and classic the buildings and architectures were during that time. Too bad that many of those structures were totally or partially damaged mostly during World War II when the Philippines was attacked by the Empire of Japan as part of its ambition to expand its empire in Asia.

Luneta c1890

Fortunately, some structures are still standing today and some places are almost left untouched. So let’s take a journey back in time as we look at the wonderful photographs of Manila then and now.

[Updates]

Calle Misericordia (now Tomas Mapua Street)

Misericordia was taken from the Confraternidad de la Santa Misericordia (Fraternity of Holy Piety) that was founded for charitable purposes in 1594 by Governor Luis Peres Dasmariñas.

Tomas Mapua Street in district of Sta. Cruz is formerly known as Calle Misericordia. Tomas Mapua is the founder and first president of the Mapua Institute of Technology (MIT) and first registered architect in the Philippines after graduating BS Architecture from Cornell University.

c1920

Calle Misericordia (now Tomas Mapua Street)

Present Day

Calle Misericordia (now Tomas Mapua Street)

Luneta Hotel

Luneta Hotel is a defunct hotel located in T.M. Kalaw Street and Roxas Boulevard in Manila. The hotel is in the Art deco style of architecture that was very popular during the early American period. The hotel is owned by the Litonjua family, and still stands to this day but has ceased operations as a hotel. It is now converted as a storage building. The old edifice is being considered for demolition.

c1902

Luneta Hotel 1900

Present Day

Luneta Hotel 2005

Calle Real del Palacio (now General Luna Street)

General Luna (also known by its old name, Calle Real del Palacio) is the closest thing Intramuros has to a main street and gives visitors easy access to most of the major attractions, including San Agustín Church and Manila Cathedral. Follow this street all the way to its northwestern tip and you'll find yourself in front of Fort Santiago; go the other way and you'll eventually end up in Rizal Park, which is just over the border in the nearby Ermita district.

c1913

Calle Real del Palacio (now General Luna) c1913

Present Day

Calle Real del Palacio (now General Luna)

Binondo Church (Minor Basilica of St. Lorenzo Ruiz)

Binondo Church, also known as Minor Basilica of St. Lorenzo Ruiz , is located in the District of Binondo, Manila, in the Philippines. This church was founded by Dominican priests in 1596 to serve their Chinese converts to Christianity. The original building was destroyed in 1762 by British bombardment. A new granite church was completed on the same site in 1852 however it was greatly damaged during the Second World War, with only the western facade and the octagonal bell tower surviving.

San Lorenzo Ruiz, who was born of a Chinese father and a Filipino mother, trained in this church and afterwards went as a missionary to Japan and was executed there for refusing to renounce his religion. San Lorenzo Ruiz was to be the Philippines' first saint and he was canonized in 1989. A large statue of the martyr stands in front of the church.

Masses are held in Filipino, in Chinese dialects (Mandarin, Hokkien), and in English.

c1902

binondo-church-1902

Present Day

binondo church

Calle Rosario, Binondo (now Quintin Paredes Street)

Quintin Parades in Binondo is the old Calle Rosario after the district’s patroness the Nuestra Señora del Rosario. The street was renamed after the Filipino statesman and lawyer Quintin Paredes. He represented Abra in Congress and became Speaker of the House.

c1905

A typical Manila street scene Calle Rosario, Binondo

Present Day

calle-rosario-binondo-before-and-today-2

c1900

calle-rosario-binondo-before-and-today

Present Day

calle-rosario-binondo-before-and-today 1

Sta. Cruz Church

The first Santa Cruz Church was erected in 1608 by the Society of Jesus, better known as Jesuits, as a parish church for the swelling ranks of Chinese immigrants to Manila, many of whom had converted to the Catholic faith. The original structure was twice damaged by earthquakes, and totally destroyed in World War II. The present building, completed in 1957, is essentially Baroque and somewhat reminiscent of the Spanish-built mission churches in southern California. Shortly before the expulsion of the Jesuit in the Philippines, a replica of the venerated image of the Nuestra Señora del Pillar was brought over to Sta. Cruz Church from Zaragoza, Spain. In the middle of the 19th century, the Our Lady of the Pillars was declared patroness of Sta. Cruz district, replacing San Entanislao Kostka. For next centuries up the present, she was the object of veneration among devotees of the Blessed Virgin.

c1900

Santa Cruz Church, Manila

Present Day

Santa Cruz Church, Manila

Malacañan Palace

The Malacañan Palace, commonly known simply as Malacañang, is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the Philippines. Located at 1000 J. P. Laurel Street, San Miguel, Manila, the house was built in 1750 in Spanish Colonial style. It has been the residence of every Philippine head since Rafael de Echague y Berminghan. During the American period, Governors-General Francis Burton Harrison and Dwight F. Davis built an executive building, the Kalayaan Hall, which was later transformed into a museum.

Originally a summer house by Spanish aristocrat Don Luis Rocha, the house was sold to Colonel Jose Miguel Formente, and was later purchased by the state in 1825. Since 1825, Malacañan Palace became the temporary residence of every Governor-General. During the Spanish–American War, Malacañan Palace became the residence of the American Civil Governors, with William Howard Taft being the first American Governor resident. During the American period, many administrative buildings were constructed and Malacañan Palace was refurbished. Emilio Aguinaldo, the first Philippine President, was the only head of the state who did not reside in Malacañan Palace, instead residing in his own home, the Aguinaldo Shrine, located in Kawit, Cavite.

c1900

Malacañan Palace

Present Day

Malacañan Palace

Dewey Boulevard (now Roxas Boulevard)

Roxas Boulevard (formerly known as Dewey Boulevard) is a boulevard in Metro Manila, and an eight-lane arterial road that connects the center of Manila with Pasay City, Parañaque City. It is one of the major arteries in the city's metropolitan network, designated as Radial Road 1. Formerly named in honor of the American Admiral George Dewey who defeated the Spanish navy in the Battle of Manila Bay in 1898, the boulevard was renamed to Roxas Boulevard in the 1960's to honor President Manuel Roxas, the fifth President of the Republic of Philippines. Roxas Boulevard runs along the shores Manila Bay and is well-known for its sunsets.

c1910

Roxas Boulevard

2005

Roxas Boulevard

Quiapo Church (Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene)

Quiapo Church is a Roman Catholic church located in the District of Quiapo, Manila. The church is one of the most popular churches in the country. It is home to the Black Nazarene, a much venerated statue of Jesus Christ which many people believe has miraculous attributes. The church was painted cream after the original Mexican Baroque edifice was burned down in 1928. It is expanded to its current form in 1984 for accommodation of thousands of devotees. Also known as St. John the Baptist Parish, the church at present belongs to the Archdiocese of Manila.

c1900

Quiapo Church

2006

Quiapo Church

These are the wonderful photographs of Manila then and now. I will try to come up with another set in the near future.

[Updates]

Thanks again for taking time to visit InhoHiway.

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Image & Caption Sources: http://www.pinoyexchange.com | http://www.skyscrapercity.com | http://quod.lib.umich.edu | http://en.wikipedia.org |

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Post a Comment

  1. grabe bakanteng bakante pa yung roxas blvrd noon hehe nice post sir

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks Blobber-Boy for dropping by.

    Yes there's really a huge difference, also the structures back then are much more magnificent and grand.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you for sharing the preserved photos. It's just sad how technology somehow wipes away some of our history. But anyhow, advancements are good, it's just some people just abuse it.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yes, advancements are good, it's just that we should give great value to our history as without it, we don't have anything to look back to.

    ReplyDelete
  5. nostalgic photos :) and yet every nation needs industrialism. The old Roxas Blvd. looks like a runway. :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. Just FYI, the very first picture on top is how Rizal Park used to look like.

    ReplyDelete
  7. These places are full of history. Yet, only few people even care to appreciate their worth. Thanks for sharing these photos to us!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I love seeing the old Kalesa :) my mom also collects their vintage photos but more of the provinces..will watch out for your next post on old photographs.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I saw this pictures on a facebook group befor. Was looking for them since I forgot which group is it.. Good thing you posted this one. Cheers! ^_^

    Everything is urbanized :(

    ReplyDelete
  10. Modernization is necessary, we just need to make sure that we keep treasures like these wonderful architectural works. Good city planning is a must.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Astig naman.. na preserve pa mga pix... Nice one :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. A simple photo you took today maybe an important part of history tomorrow, so always take care of them.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Credit to some of the photo comparisons should go to Jeric Chua and Jeffrey Yap of Skyscrapercity Forums' Philippine Then and Now.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Great Article it its really informative and innovative keep us posted with new updates. its was really valuable. thanks a lot. 

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hello Sir,

    May I ask your permission to include your photos to our textbook?

    Where can I send the formal letter?
    Thank you.

    Ger Garcia

    ReplyDelete

Your feedback is highly appreciated. Unnecessary or irresponsible comments will be deleted immediately. Thank you.

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